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Town Hall
579 Exeter Road
Lebanon, CT 06249
860.642.2011
Fax: 860.642.7716
Hours
Monday, Thursday & Friday - 8:00am-4:00pm  
Tuesday: 8:00am-6:00pm  
Closed Wednesday
Individual Department Hours May Vary

  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
  • Town of Lebanon in the Winter
 

Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House Museum

History of Lebanon, CT


 

Jonathan Trumbull Jr.

Lebanon's Museums

Post Card Gallery

How Lebanon Got Its Name

The stands of white cedar in Cedar Swamp in the Goshen section of town reminded the Rev James Fitch of the Biblical cedars of Lebanon, which were used to build King Solomon's Temple. The Biblical Lebanon was a mountain with groves of tall cedars and the words 'cedar' and 'Lebanon' are closely identified with the Bible. Although the North American white cedar is not the same species as the true cedar of Lebanon, it was a fitting association for Puritans to make. Thus Fitch gave the name of Lebanon to the new plantation when settlement began. The General Court confirmed the name in 1697. Lebanon was the first town in the colony to receive a Biblical name.

 

Source: Alicia Wayland, Remembering Lebanon, 1700-2000 (2000), 3.